University of Michigan researcher contributes to NASA findings on carbon in the atmosphere showcased in the journal Science

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High-resolution satellite data from NASA’s Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 are revealing the subtle ways that carbon links everything on Earth – the ocean, land, atmosphere, terrestrial ecosystems and human activities. Scientists using the first 2 1/2 years of OCO-2 data have published a special collection of five papers today in the journal Science that demonstrates the breadth of this research. In addition to showing how drought and heat in tropical forests affected global carbon dioxide levels during the 2015-16 El Niño, other results from these papers focus on ocean carbon release and absorption, urban emissions and a new way to study photosynthesis. A final paper by OCO-2 Deputy Project Scientist Annmarie Eldering of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, and colleagues gives an overview of the state of OCO-2 science.

Manish Verma, a Geospatial/Data Science Consultant at the University of Michigan’s Consulting for Statistics, Computing and Analytics Research (CSCAR) unit, contributed as a coauthor to an article on a new way to measure photosynthesis over time and space.

Using data from the OCO-2, Verma’s analysis helped expand the utility of measurements of solar induced fluorescence (SIF), which indicates active photosynthesis in plants. Verma’s work showed that SIF data collected from the OCO-2 satellite provides reliable information on the variability of photosynthesis at a much smaller scale — down to individual ecosystems.

This can, in turn, “lead to more reliable estimates of carbon sources — that is, when, where, why and how carbon is exchanged between land and atmosphere — as well as a deeper understanding of carbon-climate feedbacks,” according to the Science article.

For more, see the NASA press release (https://www.nasa.gov/feature/jpl/new-insights-from-oco-2-showcased-in-science) and the Science article (http://science.sciencemag.org/content/358/6360/eaam5747.full)

Real estate dataset available to researchers

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The University of Michigan Library system and the Data Acquisition for Data Sciences program (DADS) of the U-M Data Science Initiative (DSI) have recently joined forces to license a major data resource capturing parcel-level information about the property market in the United States.  

The data were licensed from the Corelogic corporation, who have assimilated deed, tax and foreclosure information on nearly all properties in the entire US. Coverage dates vary by county, some county records go back fifty years. Coverage is more comprehensive from the 1990s to the present.

These data will support a variety of research efforts into regional economies, economic disparities, trends in land-use, housing market dynamics, and urban ecology, among many other areas.

The data are available on the Turbo Research Storage system for users of the U-M High Performance Computing infrastructure, and via the University of Michigan Library.

To access the data, researchers must first sign a MOU; contact Senior Associate Librarian Catherine Morse cmorse@umich.edu for more information, or visit https://www.lib.umich.edu/database/corelogic-parcel-level-real-estate-data.

HPC training workshops begin Thursday, Sept. 21

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series of training workshops in high performance computing will be held Sept. 21 through Oct. 31, 2017, presented by CSCAR in conjunction with Advanced Research Computing – Technology Services (ARC-TS). All sessions are held at East Hall, Room B254, 530 Church St.

Introduction to the Linux command Line
This course will familiarize the student with the basics of accessing and interacting with Linux computers using the GNU/Linux operating system’s Bash shell, also known as the “command line.”
Dates: (Please sign up for only one)
• Thursday, Sept. 21, 9 a.m. – noon (full descriptionregistration)
• Thursday, Sept. 28, 9 a.m. – noon (full description | registration)
Location:
East Hall, Room B250, 530 Church St.

Introduction to the Flux cluster and batch computing
This workshop will provide a brief overview of the components of the Flux cluster, including the resource manager and scheduler, and will offer students hands-on experience.
Dates: (Please sign up for only one)
• Thursday, Sept. 28, 1 – 4 p.m. (full description | registration)
• Monday, Oct. 2, 9 a.m. – noon (full description | registration)
Location:
East Hall, Room B254, 530 Church St.

Advanced batch computing on the Flux cluster
This course will cover advanced areas of cluster computing on the Flux cluster, including common parallel programming models, dependent and array scheduling, among other topics.
Dates: (Please sign up for only one)
• Tuesday, Oct. 10, 1 – 5 p.m. (full description | registration) Location: East Hall, Room B254, 530 Church St.
• Thursday, Oct. 12, 9 a.m. – noon (full description | registration) Location: East Hall, Room B254, 530 Church St.
• Friday, Oct. 13, 9 a.m. – noon (full description | registration) Location: East Hall, Room B250, 530 Church St.

Hadoop Workshop
Learn how to process large amounts (up to terabytes) of data using SQL and/or simple programming models available in Python, Scala, and Java.
Date:
• Tuesday, Oct. 31, 1 – 5 p.m. (full description | registration)
Location:
East Hall, Room B254, 530 Church St.

SAVE THE DATE: MIDAS Annual Symposium, Oct. 11

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Please join us for the 2017 Michigan Institute for Data Science Symposium.

The keynote speaker will be Cathy O’Neil, mathematician and best-selling author of “Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy.”

Other speakers include:

  • Nadya Bliss, Director of the Global Security Initiative, Arizona State University
  • Francesca Dominici, Co-Director of the Data Science Initiative and Professor of Biostatistics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
  • Daniela Whitten, Associate Professor of Statistics and Biostatistics, University of Washington
  • James Pennebaker, Professor of Psychology, University of Texas

More details, including how to register, will be available soon.

New Data Science Computing Platform Available to U-M Researchers

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Advanced Research Computing – Technology Services (ARC-TS) is pleased to announce an expanded data science computing platform, giving all U-M researchers new capabilities to host structured and unstructured databases, and to ingest, store, query and analyze large datasets.

The new platform features a flexible, robust and scalable database environment, and a set of data pipeline tools that can ingest and process large amounts of data from sensors, mobile devices and wearables, and other sources of streaming data. The platform leverages the advanced virtualization capabilities of ARC-TS’s Yottabyte Research Cloud (YBRC) infrastructure, and is supported by U-M’s Data Science Initiative launched in 2015. YBRC was created through a partnership between Yottabyte and ARC-TS announced last fall.

The following functionalities are immediately available:

  • Structured databases:  MySQL/MariaDB, and PostgreSQL.
  • Unstructured databases: Cassandra, MongoDB, InfluxDB, Grafana, and ElasticSearch.
  • Data ingestion: Redis, Kafka, RabbitMQ.
  • Data processing: Apache Flink, Apache Storm, Node.js and Apache NiFi.

Other types of databases can be created upon request.

These tools are offered to all researchers at the University of Michigan free of charge, provided that certain usage restrictions are not exceeded. Large-scale users who outgrow the no-cost allotment may purchase additional YBRC resources. All interested parties should contact hpc-support@umich.edu.

At this time, the YBRC platform only accepts unrestricted data. The platform is expected to accommodate restricted data within the next few months.

ARC-TS also operates a separate data science computing cluster available for researchers using the latest Hadoop components. This cluster also will be expanded in the near future.

MICDE announces 2017-2018 Fellowship recipients

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MICDE is pleased to announce the recipients of the 2017-2018 MICDE Fellowships for students enrolled in the PhD in Scientific Computing or the Graduate Certificate in Computational Discovery and Engineering. We had 91 applicants from 25 departments representing 6 schools and colleges. Due to the extraordinary number of high quality applications we increased the number of fellowships from 15 to 20 awards. See our Fellowship page for more information.

AWARDEES

Diksha Dhawan, Chemistry
Negar Farzaneh, Computational Medicine & Bioinformatics
Kritika Iyer, Biomedical Engineering
Tibin John, Neuroscience
Bikash Kanungo, Mechanical Engineering
Yu-Han Kao, Epidemiology
Steven Kiyabu, Mechanical Engineering
Christiana Mavroyiakoumou, Mathematics
Ehsan Mirzakhalili, Mechanical Engineering
Colten Peterson, Climate and Space Sciences & Engineering
James Proctor, Chemical Engineering
Evan Rogers, Biomedical Engineering
Longxiu Tian, S. Ross School of Business
Jipu Wang, Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences
Yanming Wang, Chemistry
Zhenlin Wang, Mechanical Engineering
Alicia Welden, Chemistry
Anna White, Industrial & Operations Engineering
Chia-Nan Yeh, Physics
Yiling Zhang, Industrial & Operations Engineering

HONORABLE MENTIONS

Geunyeong Byeon, Industrial & Operations Engineering
Ayoub Gouasmi, Aerospace Engineering
Joseph Kleinhenz, Physics
Jia Li, Physics
Changjiang Liu, Biophysics
Vo Nguyen, Computational Medicine & Bioinformatics
Everardo Olide, Applied Physics
Qiyun Pan, Industrial & Operations Engineering
Pengchuan Wang, Civil & Environmental Engineering
Xinzhu Wei, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology

ARC-TS seeks input on next generation HPC cluster

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The University of Michigan is beginning the process of building our next generation HPC platform, “Big House.”  Flux, the shared HPC cluster, has reached the end of its useful life. Flux has served us well for more than five years, but as we move forward with replacement, we want to make sure we’re meeting the needs of the research community.

ARC-TS will be holding a series of town halls to take input from faculty and researchers on the next HPC platform to be built by the University.  These town halls are open to anyone and will be held at:

  • College of Engineering, Johnson Room, Tuesday, June 20th, 9:00a – 10:00a
  • NCRC Bldg 300, Room 376, Wednesday, June 21st, 11:00a – 12:00p
  • LSA #2001, Tuesday, June 27th, 10:00a – 11:00a
  • 3114 Med Sci I, Wednesday, June 28th, 2:00p – 3:00p

Your input will help to ensure that U-M is on course for providing HPC, so we hope you will make time to attend one of these sessions. If you cannot attend, please email hpc-support@umich.edu with any input you want to share.

Job Opening: Research Cloud Administrator

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Advanced Research Computing – Technology Services (ARC-TS)  has an exciting opportunity for a Research Cloud Administrator.

This position will be part of a team working on a novel platform for research computing in the university for data science and high performance computing.  The primary responsibilities for this position will be to develop and create a resource sharing environment to enable execution of Data Science and HPC workflows using containers for University of Michigan researchers.

For more details and to apply, visit: http://careers.umich.edu/job_detail/142372/research_cloud_administrator_intermediate

HPC training workshops begin Monday, May 15

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series of training workshops in high performance computing will be held May 15, May 17 and May 24, 2017, presented by CSCAR in conjunction with Advanced Research Computing – Technology Services (ARC-TS). All sessions are held at East Hall, Room B254, 530 Church St.

Introduction to the Linux command Line
This course will familiarize the student with the basics of accessing and interacting with Linux computers using the GNU/Linux operating system’s Bash shell, also known as the “command line.”
• Monday, May 15, 9 a.m. – noon. (full descriptionregistration)

Introduction to the Flux cluster and batch computing
This workshop will provide a brief overview of the components of the Flux cluster, including the resource manager and scheduler, and will offer students hands-on experience.
• Wednesday, May 17, 1 – 4:30 p.m. (full description | registration)

Advanced batch computing on the Flux cluster
This course will cover advanced areas of cluster computing on the Flux cluster, including common parallel programming models, dependent and array scheduling, and a brief introduction to scientific computing with Python, among other topics.
• Wednesday, May 24, 1 – 5 p.m. (full description | registration)

NOTE: Additional workshops may be scheduled if demand warrants. Please sign up for the waiting list if the workshops are full, and you will be given first priority for any additional sessions.